Transracial adoption, or the joining of racially different parents and children together in adoptive families, can be considered as a double-edged sword.

Could thinking differently help children to find a match with a new generation of parents?

Transracial adoption, whether through its various forms of domestic adoption or international adoption, is considered as the most noticeable form of adoption, because the physical differences between adoptive parents and adoptee are more visible and irreversible.

Most people seem to be sympathetic to transracial adoption parents and children because it would likely lead to an overall reduction of prejudice that would lead in turn to a more productive and healthier society. Main argument? Skin color should not determine the success of an adoption!

Accordingly, adoption agencies were recently required by law to disregard the racial, and cultural background of children when a placement is made. However, many people still believe that a good cultural fit is still an important way of creating a sense of belonging for an adopted child. This could be best illustrated by Savita de Sousa, policy consultant at the British Association for Adoption and Fostering: “Transracial adoption can have very good outcomes, but one issue keeps cropping up – and that’s a sense of loneliness and isolation, a sense of not belonging. Adoption is a new identity and when you get the added challenges of people asking ‘Why do you look so different?’ you need to think about whether you are meeting the needs of children.” Similarly, other people claim that transracial adoption is not ideal for all children because it sheds light on key issues like self-esteem, confidence and identity.Nevertheless, recent research studies have revealed that, in general, the advantages of transracial adoption outweigh the disadvantages. This could be best summed up with the following quote by Robert Morrisson:

“The quickest cure for racism would be to have everyone in the country adopt a child of another race. No matter what your beliefs, when you hold a four-day-old infant, love him, and care for him, you don’t see skin color, you see a little person that is very much in need of your love”.