Carmencitta-Magazine-Who-is-amelia-boyton-1Amelia Boynton Robinson was known as being a civil rights activist. Moreover, she was the one who defended against not letting African American vote. In fact, in 1965, she tried to help leading a civil rights march, and as a result got brutally beaten. This act is now known as Bloody Sunday and drew national attention to the Civil Rights Movement. Moreover, Amelia Boynton is the first black woman who ran for Congress in Alabama.

Synopsis

Amelia Boynton was born in Savannah, Georgia, on August 18, 1911. In fact, in 1964, Amelia became the first African-American woman, as well as the first female Democratic candidate from Alabama, who ran for a seat in Congress. After that, one year later, Boynton helped lead a civil rights march, which caused her, and other activists to be brutally beaten by state troopers.

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This event, was the reason for drawing nationwide attention to the Civil Rights movement. Boynton won the Martin Luther King Jr. Medal in 1990, which was a Medal of Freedom. She died on August 26, 2015 at the age of 104.

Early Activism

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In 1930, Boynton met Dallas County who became her co-worker. Moreover, both Boynton and County cared about finding ways to make the lives of African-American better. After that, in 1936, they got married and had two sons named Bill Jr. and Bruce Carver. Furthermore, for the next three decades, they worked in order to achieve voting, property and education rights for poor African Americans who lived in Alabama. In fact, 30 years later, her husband died, but she remained on her pledge to help African Americans have a better life.

Her Death

Boynton died at the age of 104 years, on August 26, 2015, after she suffered from several strokes. Her son Bruce Boynton said of his mother’s commitment to civil rights: “The truth of it is that was her entire life. That’s what she was completely taken with. She was a loving person, very supportive — but civil rights was her life.”