If you need to get whipped into shape, look no further than a set of ropes. These tools improve your fitness in all ways, from firming up your core to slaying calories, and as for cardio, consider the battle ropes as sprinting for the upper body.

There are loads of benefits to using ropes in your working out, but here are 5 good ones:

Improved Cardiovascular Capacity

The high intensity, high-speed movements will activate your cardiovascular capacity very quickly.

Maximum Caloric Burn

When small muscles be required to do big work it drives up caloric expenditure fast. With the biceps, triceps, shoulders and forearms moving at a high speed under tension you’ll burn many calories in a short period of time.

Improved Body Composition Changes

Ropes will make you build muscle and burn fat at the same time. Add in the Excessive Post Oxygen Consumption, also known as “after burn”, you get from this versatile tool, and you’ll be burning more calories even after your exercise is over.


Improved Timing and Coordination

Rope training is assured to improve timing and coordination that can help you in both your sport and daily life. Add into your rope training jumps, kneeling, shuffles, and moving backwards and forwards, then it becomes a full-body functional training.

Improved Mental Toughness

When it comes to making gains and getting results, never take the importance of mental toughness too lightly. An intense exercise using battle ropes will test your mental willpower without running your body into the ground.

Tips for using battle ropes:

  • Keep your core tight all the time
    • Move through the shoulders and relax your arms
    • Use quick but short movements
    • Target quality over quantity
    • Do not forget to breathe!

How long should you work the battle ropes?

Working for more than 30 seconds generally leads to form breakdown, thus shorter work periods are more effective. For instance, 20 to 30 seconds of maximum effort and intensity is better than 60 or more seconds with improper form. Maintain high intensity, and low work and rest times.